Dailymotion hack exposes 85 million users online

Dailymotion video-sharing website has suffered a massive data breach, exposing 85 million accounts of users.

Dailymotion video-sharing website launched in 2005 and is considered to be the 113th most-visited website across the world.

According to the data breach notification LeakedSource, the website confirmed to have received a database of 87.6 million user accounts with unique email addresses.

The database includes email addresses, usernames and more than 18 million of the records includes password hashes. The passwords were encrypted with Bcrypt hashing algorithm, with ten rounds of rekeying and considered as secure and hard to crack.

Bcrypt hashing is a cryptographic algorithm which makes the hashing process extremely slow that would make SHA1 and MD5 password crack nearly impossible.

ZDNet also received a sample of the stolen database and confirmed that the data is indeed from the website, but Dailymotion did not respond with any comments. According to ZDNet, “We verified the data by matching up plaintext passwords with the hashed password found against the email address using a readily available online tool. In one case, the email address and password combination were unique to Dailymotion, suggesting that the data could only have come from the video-sharing site.”

According to the LeakedSource website, hackers have stolen the archive around October 20, whose identity is still unknown.

Although the passwords were hashed but the emails contained in the database could be used for potential spam campaigns, and attackers can use them in targeted phishing campaigns.

If you use DailyMotion and one of the 18 million affected users whose hashed password has leaked, you are advised to change your password on the website, and on other websites that use your same password.

LeakedSource has added the stolen Dailymotion database on its search index which you can check whether it includes your account.

Moreover, it is advised to set complex passwords where ever possible. You can use LastPass or Keypass password managers to encrypt all your passwords with a master password.

Peter Kendrick

Peter Kendrick is a writer with emphasis on security and other interests. Senior Editor at BeEncrypted. He is passionate about latest security issues, technology, traveling and blogging. You can reach Peter Kendrick on Twitter (@peterkendrickk)

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